F1 Cars Logistical Transportation

 

With the F1 coming back this weekend to Mexico and with last class on transportation strategies I got curious on how did they transport F1 cars all around the globe. I found an article explaining each part of the process and I think it is quite interesting.

Logistical preparations start a year ahead of time, and it requires a team of almost 80 people to take care of every single detail. There are 19 races held in six continents in about eight months with two weeks of separation between each race. But in some cases there are races happening every weak and the time is limited for transportation. In those cases everything has to be at the next track within 36 hours so teams have enough time to reassemble the cars and get everything sorted before the race.

The work starts about three hours after the race ends. Once the cars are inspected after the race, technicians strip the car down to the last screw. Everything is stored in their own foam-slotted box and sometimes they use bubble wrap to take care of some painted parts.

The cars may get the most care, but there are several dozen tons of equipment to be packed and shipped. Each team carries enough spare parts to rebuild their cars, 40 sets of tires, 2,500 liters of fuel, 200 liters of motor oil and 90 liters of coolant.

Then it’s all handed over to DHL, which has to get everything to the next city. That is also really complicated. A fleet of seven jumbo flies stuff, all around the world despite the weather conditions.

It is interesting to know that F1 teams are not only pilots and engineers, but a hard working logistical team as well.

By:  Manuel Jimenez
Reference: Wired

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